Crepes around the world!
...In Swedish, a crêpe is called pannkaka, in Danish, pandekager ("pancake"); in Dutch it is a pannenkoek or flensje, and in Afrikaans a pannekoek, which is usually served with cinnamon sugar. In the Spanish regions of Galicia and Asturias they are traditionally served at carnivals. In Galicia they're called filloas, and may also be made with pork blood instead of milk. In Asturias they are called fayueles or frixuelos, and in Turkey, "Akıtma". In areas of central Europe formerly belonging to the Austro-Hungarian empire, there is a thin pancake comparable to a crêpe that in Austro-Bavarian is called Palatschinken or Omletten; in Hungarian: palacsinta; and in Bosnian, Serbian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Montenegrin, Czech, Croatian and Slovene: palačinka; in Slovak: palacinka. In the Balkan region such as the countries of Albania, Bosnia, Croatia, Macedonia, Montenegro, and Serbia, palačinka or palaçinka may be eaten with fruit jam, quark cheese, sugar, honey, or the hazelnut-chocolate cream Nutella. In Ashkenazi Jewish cuisine, there is a similar dish known as the blintz. The Oxford English Dictionary derives the German and Slavic words from the Hungarians palacsinta, which it derives from the Romanian plăcintă ("pie, pancake"), which comes in turn from classical Latin placenta ("small flat cake"). Crêpes have also long been popular in Japan, with sweet and savoury varieties being sold at many small stands, usually called crêperies. In Argentina and Uruguay they are called panqueques and are often eaten with dulce de leche. They have also become popular in North America with several crêpe franchises opening. Typically, these franchises stick to the traditional French method of making crêpes but they have also put their own spin on the crêpe with new types such as the hamburger and pizza crêpe. In Mexico, crêpes are known as crepas, and were introduced during the 19th century by the French and are typically served either as a sweet dessert when filled with cajeta (similar to dulce de leche), or as a savoury dish when filled with Huitlacoche (corn smut), which is considered a delicacy. Dishes with similar appearance, taste and preparation methods exist in other parts of the world as well. In South India, a crêpe made of fermented rice batter is called a dosa, which often has savoury fillings. In Western India, a crepe made of gram flour is called Pudlaa/Poodla, with the batter consisting of vegetables and spices. Another variety is called patibola and is sweet in taste due to milk, jaggery or sugar. The injera of Ethiopian/Eritrean/Somali/Yemeni cuisine is often described as a thick crêpe. Also in Somalia, malawax is very similar to a crêpe. It is mostly eaten at breakfast.

The names for thin crêpes in other parts of Europe are:
• Asturian: frixuelo
• Breton: krampouezh
• Bulgarian: палачинка
• Cornish: krampoeth
• Croatian: palačinka
• English: pancake
• Estonian: pannkook, ülepannikook
• Faroese: pannukaka
• Finnish: ohukainen, lätty, lettu or räiskäle
• Galician: filloas
• Greek: κρέπα (krépa)
• Hungarian: palacsinta
• Icelandic: pönnukaka
• Kazakh: құймақ (quymaq)
• Latvian: pankūka
• Lithuanian: lietiniai blynai
• Polish: naleśniki
• Portuguese: crepe
• Romanian: clătită
• Russian: блины (bliny)
• Serbian: палачинка
• Slovene: palačinka
• Spanish: tortitas
• Turkish: krep, akıtma
• Ukrainian: млинці (mlyntsi, nalysnyky)
• Welsh: cramwyth

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